Alternative Medications for Erectile Dysfunction

For centuries, men have tried all kinds of organic remedies for erectile dysfunction (ED) — that the repeated inability to get or keep an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. Although there are several medications available online, as posted in https://www.thetrentonline.com/why-you-should-consider-an-online-pharmacist-for-your-ed-needs/, do they work? It’s just not scientifically understood now. Additionally, you take these treatments at your own risk since their security profiles have yet to be established. Specialists and testimonials in alternative therapies available over the counter to get erectile dysfunction and impotence are followed by commentaries.

Ginseng

Korean red ginseng has been used to stimulate male sexual function, but many studies have tried to confirm its benefits. In a 2002 study involving 45 men with significant erectile dysfunction, the herb helped relieve symptoms of erectile dysfunction and led to “improved stiffness of penile function.” Experts aren’t sure how red ginseng might work, although it is believed to promote nitric oxide synthesis.

Talk to your doctor before taking it, as ginseng can interact with medications you’re already taking and cause allergic reactions.

 

Pomegranate Juice

Drinking antioxidant-rich pomegranate juice has been shown to have numerous health benefits, including a reduced risk for heart disease and high blood pressure. Can pomegranate juice also protect against erectile dysfunction? There’s no evidence of this, but the results of a study published in 2007 were promising. The authors of this study called for more research and said more extensive studies could show pomegranate juice’s power against erectile dysfunction.

 

Dehydroepiandrosterone

Testosterone is essential for a healthy libido and recurring sex roles. Patients with erectile dysfunction have been shown to have low testosterone levels improve when testosterone replacement therapy is prescribed. Similarly, studies have shown that taking supplements containing Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a hormone that the body converts to testosterone and estrogen, helps in some cases of erectile dysfunction. However, DHEA can have adverse effects, such as suppressed thyroid function, acne, and hair loss, and its long-term safety is unknown. For this reason, many experts advise against using supplements.

Judy Cook Author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *